The Popular Edge, Pop-Up and Book Arts News

March 4, 2011

Corcoran Class becomes a Pop-Up

Filed under: art classes, artist's books, crafts, how-to books — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 12:20 am

Carol Barton's Sculptural Book Class at the Corcoran College of Art and Design

Presenting a pop-up group photo of Carol Barton’s new Sculptural Books class at the Corcoran College of Art and Design in Washington, D.C.  Students in this graduate-level class are exploring various sculptural book forms and creating a series of finished pop-up pages and paper engineered structures. The class already has completed a basic pop-up and two accordion books, one with architectural pop-up additions.

If you’re interested in making your own pop-up photograph, visit the Popular Kinetics web site.  And if you’d like to learn more about designing pop-ups, you can check out the how-to workbooks by Ms. Barton, The Pocket Paper Engineer, volumes 1 and 2.

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July 19, 2010

Text as Camouflage

Filed under: art classes, artist's books, performace art, teaching kids — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 1:26 am

Artist Liu Bolin explores issues involving identity and loss of the sense of self within Chinese society by camouflaging his subjects to blend into their surroundings. His series of photos, begun in 2005, are works of protest against the government, which shut down his studio.

Most intriguing are those subjects covered with text. The writing obscures the person, replacing  identity with a new, written message. To see more images of Bolin’s work, go to http://www.designboom.com/weblog/cat/10/view/3738/camoflague-by-liu-bolin.html

March 9, 2010

Show of Lists at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC

Filed under: artist's books, books, scrapbooking — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 6:18 am

 

It’s a small but wonderful exhibit on display at the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art: a show of lists created by authors, artists, and art personalities. The lists are quite varied. There’s one of Joseph Cornell’s purchases at an antiques fair, with notes about what he later did with the objects. There’s a visual packing list and a list by author H. L. Mencken of his personal beliefs and general thoughts. And there’s one by architect Eero Saarinen outlining the jobs he needed to do over the course of a day. Some are written, some are typed, some are collaged together, and all give a bit of insight into their creators’ personalities. The show, with the full title Lists: To-dos, Illustrated Inventories, Collected Thoughts and Other Artists’ Enumerations will be on exhibit until September 27th, 2010.

And while you’re there, check out the Portrait Gallery show One Life, Echoes of Elvis just down the hall. It’s a quirky look at The King by artists working in a wide range of media.

January 10, 2009

It’s a Wonderful Internet Video

It's a Wonderful Internet video

Happy New Year! To begin the year, we’ve found this wonderful animation of a pop-up book based on the movie It’s a Wonderful Life. We think it’s a great example of pop-up iconography. Click here  to view it.

December 11, 2008

Thomas Allen’s Pulp Fiction

Filed under: artist's books, books, paper crafts, paper engineering, pop-up books — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 10:18 pm

Thomas Allen's Pulp Fiction Artworks

Photographer Thomas Allen has an interesting take on the pulp fiction genre. He cuts various characters from a book’s cover, theatrically positions and lights them (often with a tongue-in-cheek response to the work’s title), then photographs the results to create an eerily staged diorama with surprising dramatic impact. To see more of Allen’s work, visit the 1dak.com site.

September 16, 2008

Paper Film Noire

Filed under: art classes, artist's books, paper crafts, performace art, pop-up books — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 10:02 pm

This intriguing film noire animation was done by Australian creator Andrew Buchanan while he was a student at Melbourne’s RMIT University. It has a book-like feel, combining digital backgrounds, cut-outs and objects, all in black-and-white. A deep, deadpan narration adds to the aura of a gumshoe mystery.

August 2, 2008

Book Animation by Chris Northey


Chris Northey did this inventive 3-dimensional book animation, called “Start Running Pico,”  while living in Japan. It speaks to the dynamic balance between creation and distruction that is part of most mythologies. Watch it here on YouTube.

July 6, 2008

Feed the Hungry with a Word

Filed under: artist's books, teaching kids — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 12:20 am
FreeRice.com

FreeRice.com

“What if just knowing what a word meant could help feed hungry people around the world? Well, at FreeRice it does…the totals have grown exponentially.” 
THE WASHINGTON POST             
What a concept: improving your vocabulary while you feed the hungry world. This is one of Popular Kinetics’ favorite sites. Every English word you get right in a multiple-choice format triggers a donation of 20 grains of rice to the UN World Food Program. Doesn’t sound like much, does it? But the rice adds up quickly, and every grain is essential when fighting world hunger. A brilliant combination of education and activism! Visit the web site and apply your mind to helping in this great cause.

www.freerice.com 

June 29, 2008

Giant Political Pop-Ups

Residential Erection pop-up by Kenneth Tin-Kin Hung

 

 

 

 

 

 

With Popular Kinetics based in Washington, D.C., national politics is our local news. So we were delighted to find an artist who has used the pop-up format (large-scale, no less) as commentary on the current election campaign. Kenneth Tin-kin Hung has designed two 8x8x8-foot pop-ups, one featuring John McCain and the other Barak Obama. The first is titled Residential Erection: Elephant List, the other Residential Erection: Ultra Donkey. To see more photos, go to the Archives, April-May 2008, at  http://www.postmastersart.com

June 9, 2008

Muto, the Painted Animation

In still animation, each frame advances the story just a little bit. The frames move so quickly before your eyes that you barely notice they are individual images spliced together to create a “moving picture.” Here, the technique is sometimes visible, but all the more amazing because the images that move are painted, then scrubbed out as part of the narrative itself. This short film titled “Muto” is by the artist Blu, shot on walls in Buenos Aires and Baden, with a soundtrack by Andrea Martignoni. It is a totally captivating adventure.

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