The Popular Edge, Pop-Up and Book Arts News

April 23, 2011

Angelika Oeckl’s Tiny Pop-Up Book

Filed under: artist's books, books, paper engineering, pop-up books — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 7:13 pm

The tiniest pop-up book made by Angelika Oeckl

Angelika Oeckl’s artwork is small—REALLY SMALL. She specializes in creating miniatures, and recently took on the challenge of creating the world’s smallest pop-up book. Starting with a reproduction copy of  Franz Bonn’s 1878 German pop-up Theater Bilderbuch, she disassembled it and scanned the parts and pages into her computer to resize them. “It turned out to be much more difficult than I thought,” she says. “I had to redo it several times. Parts didn’t line up or the scene didn’t fold flat.” She finally succeeded, and she thinks this is the smallest pop-up book around—smaller than Ann Vanture’s mini reproduction of Lothar Meggendorfer’s International Circus which measures 22 mm by 21 mm.

To see more images of Angelika’s mini book, go to her Picasa Album.

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April 17, 2011

The Ice Book Pop-Up Theater

Filed under: animation, artist's books, books, performace art — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 1:29 am

The Ice Book, A Pop-Up Book TheaterThe Ice Book, A Pop-Up Book Theater

The line between books, electronics, theater and animation is becoming thinner these days with the rapid development of digital readers. We’ve seen several great apps that attempt to capture the feel of a pop-up book, although the experience is not the same as the actual paper versions. Here’s another approach in which film and pop-ups retain their distinctive qualities, yet the two are joined in a beautiful, surreal way. Created by Davy and Kristen McGuire during an artist’s residency at Kuenstlerdorf Schoeppingen in Germany, this large-scale pop-up book serves as the stage set for a story told through behind-the-page video projections. Inspired by Russian fairytales, the story is of a young boy enticed into the realm of an ice princess who wants him to warm her heart. Click here to watch the video.

To read more about this project, visit their web site at http://www.theicebook.com/Behind_the_Scenes.html

March 16, 2011

Isaac Salazar’s Altered Books

Filed under: artist's books, books, crafts, paper crafts — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 6:19 am

Read, an altered artist book by Isaac Salazar

We were first drawn to Isaac Salazar’s work with this intriguing photo in which message and medium are so wonderfully intertwined, although the irony, of course, is that folding the book’s pages makes it unreadable as is. Salazar has no training as an artist, but found his creative calling through a craft project in which old Reader’s Digest magazines were folded into Christmas trees. He wondered if other forms were possible, and obviously they are. Salazar leads a double life: an accountant by day and origami/altered book artist in his free time. Here’s a link to his Flickr bookworks gallery.

Thanks to the Typestack blog for bringing these works to our attention. If you are a typophile, check out their site: www.typestack.com

February 11, 2011

Historic Pop-Up Book Videos

Vintage Puss in Boots Pop-Up Book

A group of wonderful little videos showing historic pop-up books in action has been posted to YouTube by the Smithsonian Institution’s Cooper Hewitt Design Museum. It’s a movable library in action. Here are the links:

   Puss in Boots, 1934, Blue Ribbon Books
   Popeye with The Hag of the Seven Seas, 1935, Pleasure Books
   Cowboys in Pop-Up Action Pictures, 1951, Publicity Products, London
   Tony Sarg’s Treasure Book, 1942 B. F. Jay publishers
   Dick Tracy pop-up book by Harold Lentz, 1935, Pleasure Books
   Pinnochio pop-up book by Harold Lentz, 1933, Blue Ribbon Books
   What a Surprise by Ernest Nister, 1900, E. P. Dutton & Co.
   The Jolly Jump-Ups Journey Through Space, 1952, McLoughlin Bros.

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December 27, 2010

Medieval Help Desk

Filed under: books, teaching kids — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 9:42 pm

Medieval Help Desk video, or "How to Read a Book"

We thought this video spoof on digital books would appeal to all of you traditional bibliophiles out there. It’s a funny yet thought-provoking look at how a first encounter with a bound book in the Middle Ages might equate with our own initial efforts to use virtual media, and a reminder that the book is a fluid form, changing through history as our technologies have changed. Here’s the link.

December 4, 2010

“Augmented Reality,” A New Book Form

Filed under: animation, books, paper crafts — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 12:53 am

 “Le Monde Des Montagnes” represents yet another approach to the book form. A collaboration between illustrator Camille Scherrer and computer techs Julien Pilet, Fanny Riedo, and Nicolas Henchoz, the book bridges the gap between an actual book and a digital book in an “augmented reality” format. The actual book can be viewed normally, with text and illustrations telling the story of the world of mountains. But when connected with a computer (and we’re not sure how this connection is made), hidden animated images are revealed on the book’s pages. It’s hard to say how effective this is for the reader without having experienced the actual setup, but the video of the process  is definitely intriguing. Let us know what you think.

Learn more at the web site: http://www.chipchip.ch/2_frameset.html

November 28, 2010

An Animation with Pop-Up Effects

The Happy Duckling is an enchanting little animated film that simulates a pop-up book. The story follows an ordinary boy who is relentlessly stalked by a duck. Winner of awards around the globe including the Best Animation BAFTA Scotland Award, the piece was written by renown Israeli animator Gill Dolev. Dolev enrolled the help of eight students at the Universities of Dundee and Aebertog in Scotland to help him produce the film. From the results, it looks like they learned a lot and had a great time working on the project. To complete the film, an inventive original score was added by composer Mick Cooke.  Here’s the link.

November 15, 2010

Pop-Up Book Cake of Bethesda, Maryland

Filed under: books, pop-up books — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 12:05 am

We love the winner of Bethesda Magazine’s cake decoration contest, both because it features our home town and because it represents Bethesda, Maryland, as a pop-up book. Created by Patrick Musel and his staff at the Praline Bakery and Bistro, the cake ‘s pages don’t actually turn, but they look convincing enough as a bit of paper engineered frosting. It was elected best cake by 51 percent of those participating in the on-line vote. Congratulations!

September 13, 2010

Peter Dahmen’s sculptural pop-ups

Filed under: animation, books, paper crafts, paper engineering, pop-up books — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 11:16 pm

Sculptural pop-up video by Peter Dahmen
German graphic designer Peter Dahmen has a stunning video on Youtube showing the mechanical movements of his sculptural pop-ups. Executed in plain white paper, the pop-ups in the video become choreographed plays in light and shadow with the turning of each page.

Here’s the link:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuQsxFhBGzw

June 28, 2010

“Bookshelf Porn” for Bibliophiles Only

Filed under: books — Tags: , — popularkinetics @ 7:33 am

This blog stretches the definition of “pornography” to mean that which “excites and stimulates.” It will definitely grab the attention of book-lovers, but if you’re looking for something a little more steamy, check those emails in your spam box.

Here’s the link: http://bookshelfporn.com/

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