The Popular Edge, Pop-Up and Book Arts News

December 2, 2012

Metamorphosis Books

Filed under: books, paper crafts — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 7:13 pm

   Metamorphosis Book  
The metamorphosis book, also referred to as the “harlequinade,” was a simple movable book format that first appeared in the mid 1600’s. Later in the 1770’s, inexpensive harlequinades were printed in England featuring the adventures of a harlequin character popularized in pantomime  theater plays at that time. The books featured a full-page image overlayed with two half-page pictures that lined up with the image underneath. By turning up and down the half-page flaps, four versions of the illustration would appear and the storyline would be advanced. Werner Nekes has created a delightful little YouTube video of these books in action. Today we are inundated with moving images of all types, so it’s often hard for us to image how exciting this simple device must have been in a time when “movies” did not exist.

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October 30, 2012

Lavatory Self Portraits in the Flemish Style

Filed under: art classes, paper crafts, performace art — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 8:38 pm

Here’s a novel approach to developing an alternate persona: Nina Katchadourian’s extemporaneous “Flemish” portraits created with materials typically found in  public restrooms: paper towels, toilet paper and seat covers. Katchadourian frequently works with simple found materials, improvising them into artworks around a specific theme which she then photographs. For the 2012 election she has created a piece called Monument to the Unelected with campaign signs she’s designed to commemorate those who failed in their election bids. A version of this piece is now on display at the Washington Post offices here in Washington, DC. To see more of Katchadourian’s work, visit her web site.

 Monument to the Unelected

October 25, 2012

Horrorgami Adams Family House for Halloween

Filed under: crafts, paper crafts, paper engineering — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 10:30 pm

From early childhood, London artist Marc Hagan-Guirey has been a huge fan of horror movies. He began working with kirigami (the Japanese art of cutting an image from a single piece of paper) by designing a model of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis House in Los Angeles, but then gravitated to more spooky edifices with a design for the house that served as the set in the Adams Family television show. From there he’s moved on to create a Horrorgami Overlook Hotel (The Shining), The Amityville House, and the MacNeil house from The Exorcist. He has plans to do more, and has a show coming up in November at Gallery One-and-a-Half in London. A video of the artist and his work is at this link. Thanks to Betsy Rubinstein for bringing these horrors to our attention.

September 16, 2012

Paper Forest Web Site

Filed under: art classes, crafts, paper crafts, paper engineering — Tags: — popularkinetics @ 8:14 pm

Paper Forest web site

For all of you paper lovers out there, The Paper Forest blog is a treasure trove of projects to make, paper art exhibitions, and related links. Fed by five artists, Jaime Zollars, Shelley Noble, Matt Hawkins, Dan McPharlin, and Falk Keuten, it reflects their wide range of interests and artistic views. Here’s the link to the site:  http://paperforest.blogspot.com/ 

September 12, 2012

Isabelle de Borchgrave’s Paper Dress Exhibition

Filed under: paper crafts, paper engineering — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 1:05 am

Isabelle de Borchgrave paper dressIsabelle de Borchgrave paper dress detail

Hillwood Museum and Gardens, the former home of the General Foods Corporation heiress Marjorie Merriweather Post, is currently showing an exhibition of paperworks by Isabelle de Borchgrave inspired by historic costumes and dresses.  Trims, ribbons, buttons and even the lace on each outfit are all fashioned from various papers, painted in a trompe-l’oeil fashion to imitate the textiles of the period. Several of the dresses are displayed within the furnished rooms of the Hillwood Mansion, while others are shown in a more contemporary gallery setting within the Adirondack Building on the grounds. Definitely worth a visit when in the Washington, DC, area, the exhibition continues through December 30, 2012.

Hillwood Museum, Mansion Library

September 8, 2012

Pop-Up Book by Andreas Johansson

Pop-up landscape book by Swedish artist Andreas Johansson

We thought this pop-up book by Swedish artist Andreas Johansson was quite striking. Titled From Where the Sun Now Stands it features imaginary landscapes collaged together from photographs the artist took in his neighborhood. Says the artist, “I create imaginary places that are both recognizable and completely alien. These new sites are constructions and have no history, while the places where the photographs once were taken have a very important past. For me, deserted places have a great symbolic value. They represent society’s backside, but also freedom beyond control and regulations.To view a video of the book, visit

http://ny.voltashow.com/Andreas-Johansson.7320.0.html

August 27, 2012

Pop Your Candidate into the White House

Filed under: crafts, paper crafts, paper engineering, teaching kids — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 8:10 pm

With the Republican and Democratic conventions now on the horizon, it’s time for everyone to make a pop-up choice. Pop your candidate into the White House by downloading the images and instructions for constructing your own campaign 2012 pop-up card. Visit http://www.campaignpopup.com  And don’t forget to vote at the polls  in November.

May 29, 2012

Der Mensch als Industriepalast video

Filed under: animation, paper crafts — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 11:46 pm

 The early 20th century was a time of great innovation and mechanization. Artists, designers and architects were fascinated with this new industrialization. (Recall Le Corbusier’s declaration that “The house is a machine for living). In 1927, German writer and artist Fritz Kahn designed an illustration titled “Der Mensch als Industrieplast” or “Man as Industrial Palace.” It related the complexities of the human body to those of working machines.

 Henning Lederer, a young German communications student, discovered this image in 2006 and set about to update and automate it in video format. The result is a wonderful mix of science and creative interpretation. You can watch the video here. 

May 19, 2012

A Big Apple Pop-Up

Filed under: artist's books, books, paper crafts, paper engineering, pop-up books — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 9:23 pm

Pop-Up New York City book by Daisy Lew

We thought this pop-up book by young designer Daisy Lew was worth noting for its unusual structure, combining a host of little pop-up blocks to create larger images of New York City icons: the Big Apple, a yellow taxi, the Chrysler Building and the Statue of Liberty. From one angle the pop-ups look like a city of multi-level skyscrapers, and from above you get the whole view. Check out the book on her web site at www.daisylew.com/popup.html

March 26, 2012

Japanese Cherry Blossom Festival Pop-Up Cards

Tea House pop-up to make, by artist Carol BartonTorii Gate pop-up to make, by artist Carol Barton

To celebrate the National Cherry Blossom Festival and the 100th anniversary of Japan’s gift of cherry trees to our nation’s capital, the National Building Museum commissioned artist and paper engineer Carol Barton to design do-it-yourself pop-ups that kids (and adults) could make at the event this past weekend. A pop-up Japanese Tea House and a pop-up of the Miajima Torii Gate were among the projects. Both were given out free to the crowd, along with instructions on how to cut out and assemble them. Volunteers helped with the assembly process, and everyone seemed pleased with their take-home pop-up souvenirs.

To make your own Japanese Cherry Blossom Festival pop-ups, download the designs and directions from www.cherryblossompopup.com, print them onto card stock paper and glue them together. The trees have already lost their blossom due to this year’s early spring, but you’ll have the pop-ups to remember them by.

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