The Popular Edge, Pop-Up and Book Arts News

March 3, 2009

Paper-Based Visualization Competition

Filed under: art classes, crafts, paper crafts, paper engineering, teaching kids — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 8:31 pm

Petals by Charlene Lam

 

For all of us who love working with paper, the entries in this year’s Paper-Based Visualization Competition are aethetically diverse and inspiring. To see photos, visit http://infosthetics.com/archives/2009/02/paper-based_visualization_competition_the_winner_and_more.html

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January 10, 2009

It’s a Wonderful Internet Video

It's a Wonderful Internet video

Happy New Year! To begin the year, we’ve found this wonderful animation of a pop-up book based on the movie It’s a Wonderful Life. We think it’s a great example of pop-up iconography. Click here  to view it.

August 30, 2008

Pop Your Candidate Into the White House!

Filed under: art classes, crafts, how-to books, paper crafts, pop-up books, teaching kids — Tags: , , , , , , — popularkinetics @ 10:12 pm

 

It’s fun, it’s easy, and you don’t even have to register! Print this file on card stock and pop the candidate of your choice out of the page and into the White House.

Click here to download the pdf file, print all three pages onto card stock, then follow instructions to assemble your own Campaign ’08 pop-up card. And don’t forget to VOTE in November.

 

 

 

Want to make more pop-ups? Order Carol Barton’s workbook,
The Pocket Paper Engineer
How to Make Pop-Ups Step-by-Step
http://www.popularkinetics.com/sales_page.html

August 2, 2008

Book Animation by Chris Northey


Chris Northey did this inventive 3-dimensional book animation, called “Start Running Pico,”  while living in Japan. It speaks to the dynamic balance between creation and distruction that is part of most mythologies. Watch it here on YouTube.

July 24, 2008

The Art and Science of Folding Paper

Filed under: art classes, crafts, paper crafts, teaching kids — Tags: , , , , — popularkinetics @ 10:42 pm
Robert Lang's Origami BiCurve Pot 13

Robert Lang's Origami BiCurve Pot 13

 

A new film by Vanessa Gould called “Between the Folds” highlights 10 artists who left behind careers and graduate degrees to become paper artists. Attracted by the relationship between paperfolding, geometry, and the natural world, they work on the cusp of science and art. To preview short clips from the film, visit the 2008 Rhode Island International Film Festival site and click on the “Video” tab above the synopsis.

July 6, 2008

Feed the Hungry with a Word

Filed under: artist's books, teaching kids — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 12:20 am
FreeRice.com

FreeRice.com

“What if just knowing what a word meant could help feed hungry people around the world? Well, at FreeRice it does…the totals have grown exponentially.” 
THE WASHINGTON POST             
What a concept: improving your vocabulary while you feed the hungry world. This is one of Popular Kinetics’ favorite sites. Every English word you get right in a multiple-choice format triggers a donation of 20 grains of rice to the UN World Food Program. Doesn’t sound like much, does it? But the rice adds up quickly, and every grain is essential when fighting world hunger. A brilliant combination of education and activism! Visit the web site and apply your mind to helping in this great cause.

www.freerice.com 

June 9, 2008

Muto, the Painted Animation

In still animation, each frame advances the story just a little bit. The frames move so quickly before your eyes that you barely notice they are individual images spliced together to create a “moving picture.” Here, the technique is sometimes visible, but all the more amazing because the images that move are painted, then scrubbed out as part of the narrative itself. This short film titled “Muto” is by the artist Blu, shot on walls in Buenos Aires and Baden, with a soundtrack by Andrea Martignoni. It is a totally captivating adventure.

May 29, 2008

Thomas Jefferson’s Library–Recreated

Filed under: art classes, books, libraries, teaching kids — Tags: , , , , , — popularkinetics @ 12:00 am

Biblia, from the Thomas Jefferson library

Many people know of the Library of Congress and take time to visit it’s beautiful Jefferson Building while here in Washington, D.C. But they may not realize that the core of the library was Thomas Jefferson’s own collection of books. Jefferson was an avid reader and acquired books throughout his lifetime. He eventually amassed the largest personal collection in the United States at the time. Then came the War of 1812, when the British burned Congress’s first library of 1000 titles. Jefferson offered to sell his library of 6,487 volumes to Congress. They purchased it for $23,950 in 1815. Sadly, a second fire in the library in 1851 destroyed approximately 4000 of those books.

Over the past ten years, the Library of Congress has been attempting to re-create the original Jefferson collection. Working with book dealers in the U.S. and Europe, they have managed to locate copies of most of the books. (There are still about 300 very rare books that are missing and may never be found.) The books are on display at the library, in the same configuration that they were at Jefferson’s Monticello home: in a spiral, organized into the categories of memory, reason, and imagination. The exhibit is behind glass, but visitors can look through the books digitally on computers using touch-screen technology to turn the pages.

To see photos of some of the books in Jefferson’s Library, visit the exhibit at http://myloc.gov/exhibitions/jeffersonslibrary/Pages/default.aspx

May 16, 2008

What is Art?

Filed under: art classes, children's classes, teaching kids — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 9:58 pm

What is art? Critics have debated this question forever. Here is a funny yet thoughtful discussion of the subject, presented in claymation by a host of gregarious animal characters. Though they don’t answer the question definitively, they make some pertinent points.

May 9, 2008

Carl Warner’s Photographic Food Landscapes

Filed under: art classes, teaching kids — Tags: — popularkinetics @ 5:25 am

Carl Warner\'s photographic food landsapes

These landscapes by British photographer Carl Warner are composed of the stuff of grocery stores and farmers’ markets. Fruits, vegetables, and grains all serve to suggest landscape elements. The artist photographs individual components while his subjects are fresh, then digitally constructs the layers into finished scenes. To see more of Warner’s work, visit the haha.nu blogzine or Warner’s fancy website (requiring Flash 6 or above).

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