The Popular Edge, Pop-Up and Book Arts News

November 2, 2014

Flexible Paper Sculptures by Li Hongbo

Filed under: paper crafts, paper engineering, performace art — Tags: , — popularkinetics @ 6:01 am
Flexible Sculpture of face by Li Hongbo

Traditional Chinese toys and decorations made from layers of thin paper were the inspiration for artist Li Hongbo’s first flexible paper sculptures. He and his assistant start by carefully gluing tens of thousands of paper sheets into large paper blocks. Then Li uses an electric saw to carve faces and bodies from the blocks. They look like fine marble until they are lifted from their bases and unfold across the room, revealing their multi-layered composition. Here are a few videos to watch them in action:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VtORrWaePDA
http://www.wimp.com/artpaper/

December 21, 2011

Paper Takes Flight

Filed under: paper crafts, paper engineering — Tags: , , — popularkinetics @ 8:57 pm

Torn paper often finds its way into the recycling bin (we hope). But Australian sculptor Anna-Wili Highfield uses it in another way by molding paper into her amazing bird and animal sculptures. Loosely painted, the paper pieces are sewn together into finished animal forms. Her sculptures have a light and airy feel that transcends the “deadness” of traditional taxidermy and evokes the thrill of watching creatures in motion. Anna-Wili worked as a scenic artist at the Opera Australia in Sydney before taking off in her sculptural career. To see more of her work, visit her web site, http://www.annawilihighfield.com/cgi1/index_Final.cgi

May 4, 2008

Matt Schlian’s paper engineering

Filed under: paper crafts, pop-up books — Tags: , , , — popularkinetics @ 11:17 pm

Matt Schlian\'s paper engineer sculpture

Matt Schlian does amazing things with paper! But even more fascinating is his collaborative work with scientists at the University of Michigan. There they are studying how paper folding relates to protein structure. Mis-folded proteins are suspected to be one of the causes of Alzehimer’s disease, for example, and paper folding on a nano scale might lead to a better understanding of how to correct this problem. To see images of Matt’s work and read more about this project, visit marcusprize.blogspot.com/2008/02/matt-schlian.html and also his website www.mattschlian.com

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